Consultation about the delivery of mental health day opportunities

Closed 8 Feb 2013

Opened 6 Nov 2012

Feedback Updated 23 Apr 2013

We Asked

We asked people in Camden how mental health day opportunities can be modernised and how they should be delivered in the future. The consultation was only about the consortium day services, which are provided by a consortium of three centres; Barnes House, Crossfield centre and Holy Cross Centre Trust. The council proposed three options on how to deliver future mental health day opportunities and encouraged people to express a preference for one of them. The options were: Option one: continue to provide mental health day opportunities in the same way we do now but from one centre instead of three. Option two: mental health wellbeing centre (“the hub”). Option three: no commissioned day opportunity service.

You Said

According to what was said during meetings and in questionnaires people favoured option 2 slightly; with the existence of a centre and the offer of a 6-8 weeks targeted preventative service available regardless of eligibility as the most attractive elements within this model. However, there was also some support towards the continuation of the Support and Time Recovery (STR) model in option 1, mainly from people who are satisfied with the services currently provided by the consortium or by those who are very reluctant to change. Option 3 got a lower level of support than the other two options. Some people saw it as a good way of increasing choice and independence but there are fears that service providers may not be subject to tight monitoring and quality checks and this may impact on the safety and wellbeing of the most vulnerable service users.

We Did

On 10 April 2013, the Cabinet considered a report containing the findings of this consultation and considerations about strategic direction, finances and current service delivery of mental health day opportunities. The Cabinet approved the development of a mental health wellbeing centre providing targetted prevention services for all as well as on-going day support for eligible customers wishing to access the service (Option two).

Results Updated 26 Nov 2013

What people told us about each option (summary)

  • According to what was said during meetings and in questionnaires people favoured option 2 slightly; with the existence of a centre and the offer of a 6-8 weeks targeted preventative service available regardless of eligibility as the most attractive elements within this model. 
  • However, there was also some support towards the continuation of the Support and Time Recovery (STR) model in option 1, mainly from people who are satisfied with the services currently provided by the consortium or by those who are very reluctant to change. 
  • Option 3 got a lower level of support than the other two options. Some people saw it as a good way of increasing choice and independence but there are fears that service providers may not be subject to tight monitoring and quality checks and this may impact on the safety and wellbeing of the most vulnerable service users.
 
A full report on the findings of the consultation is available on the document below which combines what people said during meetings with responses received via questionnaires. 
 
What happened next
 
On 10 April 2013, the Cabinet considered a report containing the findings of this consultation and considerations about  strategic direction, finances and current service delivery of mental health day opportunities. The Cabinet approved the development of a mental health wellbeing centre providing targetted prevention services for all as well as on-going day support for eligible customers wishing to access the service (Option two).
 
Outcome

In November 2013, we announced plans to change the way mental health day services are delivered across the borough.

A new mental health wellbeing centre – based at Crossfield’s Day Centre in Swiss Cottage – will open in February 2014. The centre will focus on giving people who use mental health services greater choice and control over the kind of help they receive.

The Holy Cross Centre Trust was selected to run the new mental health wellbeing centre following a rigorous selection process.

A number of services will also be delivered from a range of other venues across the borough.

People who experience mental health problems will be able to receive a more personalised service with a greater choice of activities which can be accessed at times, and from places, that are convenient for them.

The centre will offer a six to eight-week period of targeted support, free of charge to anyone who wants to use it, regardless of their eligibility for adult social care services. It will also offer personalised and recovery-focused day opportunity activities and on-going support to those who are eligible for adult social care services. 

Find out more

We will update people over the next few months on how the new model of mental health day opportunities is being implemented.

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Overview

Between November 2012 and February 2013 we asked people in Camden how mental health day opportunities can be modernised and how they should be delivered in the future. The consultation was only about the consortium day services, which are provided by a consortium of three centres; Barnes House, Crossfield centre and Holy Cross Centre Trust.

The council proposed three options on how to deliver future mental health day opportunities and encouraged people to express a preference for one of them.

The options were.

Option one: continue to provide mental health day opportunities in the same way we do now but from one centre instead of three.

Option two: mental health wellbeing centre (“the hub”).

Option three: no commissioned day opportunity service.

We also asked people to suggest other ways of delivering the service or to consider combining elements of several models into a new option. At the same time, we asked about the impact that each of these options would have on people's lives, if any of them were adopted.

Why We Are Consulting

Areas

  • All Areas

Audiences

  • Black and minority ethnic groups
  • Carers
  • Community and voluntary groups
  • Council staff
  • Council tenants
  • Councillors
  • Disabled people
  • Faith communities
  • Health service users
  • Leaseholders
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender groups
  • Local groups and organisations
  • Non-service users
  • Older people
  • Other local service providers
  • Residents
  • Service users
  • Young people

Interests

  • Community and living
  • Social care and health